Inspired by Copenhagen Cycle Chic

Cyclist of the month

Cyclist of the month… bicycle designer Elian

His great grandfather had a bicycle shop, where his grandmother spoked wheels in the cold Dutch winters and his father ran around as a little boy. At the age of 3 Elian learned how to cycle, when 15 years old he started to work in a bike shop and now he has designed the ultimate city bike, the Minute. In short; Elian’s life is all about bicycles!Elian Veltman

The ultimate city bike
Elian is a bike designer. He makes handcrafted bicycles; “the process of designing a bike starts with a blank paper, I talk to the customer, what does he/she want, what is their ideal cycling position, where and how will they use the bike, I take their measurements and then I start.The result is the perfect bike for that person.”
Minute bike
While designing these bikes, Elian realized many people were looking for a bike that would solve the typical urban biking problems many people face: “It should be a bike that they could leave in their apartment (not to get stolen on the street). Not too heavy, not too big, easy maneuverable in the busy city centre’s of Amsterdam and Utrecht and easy to park in the full bike parking’s. Also most people want to sit upright, cycle comfortably and they want to be able to carry groceries and kids on their bikes. When I kept hearing those same requests for a bike, I decided to design the Ultimate City Bike. And we just launched it: the Minute.”

Minute Introduction from Minute Cycles on Vimeo.

Minute city bikeGreat grandfather’s bike shop
Elian’s great grandfather had a bike shop in Maarn (close to Utrecht). Elian’s father still remembers being there as a little boy: “His grandfather was a typical bike repairman. He always wore a blue overall, his hands were black of all the repair work and he was always smoking. He still remembers the smell of his workplace.” In the village of Maarn almost everyone had a Fongers bicycle. “The winters were much harsher then, so in winter people couldn’t cycle because of all the snow, in these winters there were no repairs to do. In those months my great grandparents and grandparents had another task: spoking wheels for Fongers. That is how it went in those days.”

Opa Vreekamp voor Fietsenwinkel

Elian’s great grandfather in front of the bike shop

Links eerst etalage van Opa vreekamp, met soltaat en kind
Family support
Elian lives in Leersum, a village in the green Utrechtse Heuvelrug. His workplace is in the shed of his parents in Maurik. Every morning he cycles to work through the forest and the fields. He has a little son for whom he built a walking bike. “I get a lot of support from my family; my wife moved mountains to get the Minute launched, my 16 year old brother helps building bikes, and my father brings technical knowledge – which often comes in handy.” Even Elian’s grandmother offered help: “Let me know when I can help, I can still spoke wheels like in the old days!”
Elian cargo bike

MINUTE CYCLES FILM – IBM Contest: People 4 Smarter Cities #ps4c from JAN (JustAnotherNerd) on Vimeo.


Cyclist of the month… singer songwriter Andy

Andy knows what it is to follow your heart. She used to be an investment banker for one of the Netherlands’ biggest banks, but she stopped that promising career to follow her heart and she became a musician. Andy is a happy, positive, 30 year old Dutch singer songwriter. She sings about love, love in relationships but also love for a city. And Andy… she is in love with Amsterdam.

Andy by Aude de Prelle

Andy loves Amsterdam
Nine years ago Andy moved to Amsterdam and she fell in love with the city. “Amsterdam is beautiful, the atmosphere is good and there are so many different people. The fact that there are more bikes than people makes the city even cooler. Everyone cycles! Cycling makes people more social then when everyone sits in their own car. I also love the trams in the city. Sometimes I just hop into a tram and let it take me to its final destination. In those 9 years I got to know all the tram routes!”

City Love
‘City love’ is the name of the record Andy is working on. She is in the middle of a crowdfunding campaign to finance it. With as little as 10 euros people can fund it: “Crowdfunding the money to release my second record is a logical choice for me. Music is social. It is my way to communicate. I make music for people. To move them, to inspire them, or to make them happy. So if I make music for ‘the crowd’ why not involve them in the process of producing my record?” The campaign is going well. In only two weeks Andy funded nearly 60% of her project. The record ‘City love’ is about Andy’s love for Amsterdam and about love between people. “Love is nice, it is horrible, it is disastrous… sometimes love makes you act like a complete idiot. That is what makes love fascinating.”
andy by aude
Racing bike
Andy is not only in love with her city, but also with her bike. She bought her racing bike 6 years ago on Marktplaats (the Dutch eBay). “I bought it because I wanted to see if I liked to go racing. But the bike wasn’t good enough for long cycles so I kept it as a city bike. I have many bikes that got stolen in Amsterdam so I am very careful with this one. I used to carry it up three stairs to my apartment, so that I didn’t have to leave it on the street. Luckily I now have a shared garden with a little storage box where I can put it.”

andy by aude

Look at Andy: No side wheels!
Andy has one very clear memory of when she was 4 and learned to cycle. “It was the last day I would cycle with side wheels. I knew that this would be a ‘Kodak’ moment, so that morning I put on my best dress and cycled with a big smile, and my cute little pink basket to my father taking the picture.”

andy by aude

(Cycling) style
Like most Dutch Andy doesn’t have a ‘cycling’ style, she just cycles with what she is wearing that day. Almost always Andy wears All Stars: “I wear All Stars since I was 9 years old and they really became part of my identity. I wouldn’t go on stage without my All Stars. People would just be so surprised to see me wearing something else.” We also loved Andy’s ring: “That ring used to be my grandma’s. That makes it extra special. My grandma was a tiny lady. She was always very sweet, friendly and quiet. But she was a tough cookie: she had 9 kids and a bakery and her husband passed away quite young. So she worked incredibly hard! Also she was a talented violin player. When I look at the ring I think about the hard work she did and that she didn’t have a chance to make music her life. I then feel so lucky that I do have the chance. That is why I decided to go for it. To follow my heart…”

andy by aude

  • Want to help Andy to make her dream come true? Fund her crowdfunding campaign!
  • Andy is planning a world tour. Do you know a nice venue where she could play? Email her!  andy@sidewalkconcert.com

Photos: Aude; Text: Joni


Cyclist of the month: author Pete Jordan

On a Saturday afternoon at StarBikes, I met up with Pete Jordan, author of In The City of Bikes, to talk about his book, Amsterdam, and of course, cycling. In The City of Bikes is a memoir-like historical fact book telling the story of Amsterdam’s cycling history and culture. It takes you back to the 1890s, through the Nazi occupation, and to the city still filled with bikes we know today.
Cyclist of the month: Pete Jordan

How long have you been in Amsterdam?

I came to Amsterdam in 2002 to take a one-semester-long urban planning course. 11 years, 8 apartments, and 4 bikes later, I’m still here. I blame the bikes.

Your book is all about the history of cycling in Amsterdam. What’s your favorite bit of history?

I found the war years (WWII) incredibly interesting. Amsterdammers showed a massive amount of resistance to the Germans. And it was something everyone could do: lolly-gag on their bikes in front of an impatient, waiting, honking German car.

What was the inspiration behind the book?

I was enthralled by all the cyclists from day I arrived in Amsterdam and I started asking around for books about it. To my surprise, I found nothing. Cycling is so normal in this city that no one has bothered to write a book about the topic!

Cyclist of the month: Pete Jordan
Cyclist of the month: Pete Jordan
Cyclist of the month: Pete Jordan

And the best or worst thing about cycling in Amsterdam?

I’m still amazing that it keeps growing! Look at the Haarlemmerstraat, the best street in Amsterdam. You’d think all the cyclists going every which way would cause complete chaos–but in fact, it works. My least favorite is tied between the tourists and scooters. Yesterday I saw 2 tourists collide in front of the Rijksmuseum. It’s comical, but also just dangerous.

Any other plans with the book? A sequel? A photo exhibit? 

The Dutch version of the book, De Fietsrepubliek, has an excellent photo section unlike the English version. I’m planning to extend the gallery into a book on its own. Now the website is also up and running, and I also offer private tours based on the book. And I’m working on a guide book for cycling tourists that will be out next year.

What’s something that most people don’t know about you?

A while ago, I started collecting all these loose, often broken bike parts from all over the city. In no time at all, I had almost every piece I needed for a whole bike. I wanted to put all the pieces together, but then I realized: a bike made from broken parts is just a broken bike. So I threw them all away.
Cyclist of the month: Pete Jordan
Cyclist of the month: Pete Jordan

by Meredith

***

For more information about Pete Jordan, his tours, and In The City of Bikes, head to www.cityofbikes.com


Cyclist of the Month: Niels, the actor

Constructing your own bicycle out of old parts? That’s something Niels Gomperts loves to do, as his two striking, circus-like bicycles illustrate. Actually, Niels is a selfmade handyman who can fix and construct almost anything. And with artists’ blood flowing through his veins, all his creations have an artistic touch.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

His beautiful home in the heart of Amsterdam, which seems to be an ongoing creative construction site, represents his bohemian lifestyle. In front of his house, his two bicycles are parked on a bridge.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Cycling all the way to Poland Niels and his friends made a pit stop in Berlin, where they visited a friend with a very colourful collection of bicycles. Returning home Niels couldn’t wait to get started on his own. For both bicycles he used old bicycle-parts, and for the steering wheel of the ‘low-rider’ he ‘borrowed’ his grandmothers walking frame. Nice touch!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Though he doesn’t ride them daily, he does take them out to cruise through the Vondelpark – sometimes accompanied by a sound installation – or go to a cafe. Of course he fell of a number of times, but hey, that’s the best way to learn. Now he can handle just about any moving vehicle.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Niels isn’t just a skilled handyman, he is also an actor and appears on Dutch television and in several movies. He acted in the movies Lena and Shocking Blue, but he is probably best known for his role in Penoza, a fantastic television show about a Dutch mafia family. So Niels is definitely a talented and remarkable individual. If you keep an eye out, you might see him cruising around town with his head in the clouds.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA


Cyclist of the month : Massy, the ice cream delivery man

Born in Afganistan in the 80’s, Massy and his family moved to the Netherlands more than 20 years ago. As a child he discovered the Dutch culture, he learned to cycle straight away and felt in love with this way of moving around. He likes the feeling of being independent on his bike, to be free to go everywhere and to breathe the fresh air.. He never went back to Afghanistan but he is pretty sure the bicycle is not as popular as it is here !
Amsterdam cycle chic
Massy is living in Utrecht. A few months ago, a friend inspired him to start a new business. His friend was selling ice creams on his delivery bike.

He couldn’t stop thinking this idea was very good and would be much appreciated by all the Amsterdammers !
So he just started with one of his mates a new company on wheels : bikeexpress.nl (site still under construction)
Amsterdam cycle chic
They have 2 ice cream delivery bikes, one is mostly cycling in Amsterdam North, while the other one goes around Amsterdam East. They offer our most beloved flavors : vanilla (in pole position !) strawberry and chocolate, or pistache, or lemon, etc
Amsterdam cycle chic
Massy loves selling ice creams. The reason is very simple: he is happy to make people smile. It is related to what makes him happy in life : « to help people in every way I can help ». He is already doing so since a long time as he has worked many years for Amnesty International and other NGOs. He also initiated this nice project ofoundation.nl. Massy’s dream is « to have a positive influence in the development of the human kind ».

Amsterdam cycle chic

Reportage by Aude

I was happy to meet Massy and to taste his delicious ice creams while enjoying the Oosterpark with my little baby.

Let’s see what he will offer us in the winter : broodjes, soup ?


Cyclist of the Month: Photographer Julie Hrudova

Cyclist of the Month: Photographer Julie Hrudova
Cyclist of the Month: Photographer Julie Hrudova
“I never plan to take pictures, I just bring my camera everywhere and then funny situations happen or special people pass in front of me and I take pictures. To be honest, I am quite a lazy photographer.” Amsterdam Cycle Chic is talking with Julie Hrudova a Czech born photographer living and working in Amsterdam. Julie made an Amsterdam Street Diary with her photos that in a few months will be exposed in the Amsterdam Central Library (OBA). “I like to photograph people, animals and kids. I focus on details; on expressions on faces, on reflections and shadows.”
Cyclist of the Month: Photographer Julie Hrudova
Cyclist of the Month: Photographer Julie Hrudova
Cyclist of the Month: Photographer Julie Hrudova
Cycling in Amsterdam
Julie was born in Prague. When she was 10 years old she moved with her parents to Broek in Waterland a picturesque village north of Amsterdam. She remembers her first visit to Amsterdam: “I was overwhelmed by all the cyclists and when a few years later I started cycling in the city I found it quite difficult. There are certain unwritten rules; you can’t definitely go too slow and you have to indicate very well when you want to cross a street.” Now Julie loves to cycle and she cycles every day: “It is a moment to relax, to reflect on my day. I do not like to cycle along the canals, I prefer to take long straight streets. Then I don’t have to think and I can go fast.”
Cyclist of the Month: Photographer Julie Hrudova
Cyclist of the Month: Photographer Julie Hrudova

Prague
When Julie visits her family and friends in Prague she also takes pictures: “Dutch and Czech people have very different expressions on their faces. I think that Dutch people enjoy life and relaxing a bit more on their boats, in cafes and terraces, whereas Czechs are often exhausted due to tighter work schedules and pressure. I like to observe these differences. Further on, it is fascinating to see Prague transforming from a grey city of decayed buildings I used to live in into a popular tourist destination of shiny cars, billboards and luxury shops. When I’m there it always strikes me how much it has changed.”

Cyclist of the Month: Photographer Julie Hrudova
Amsterdam Street Dairy
“The Amsterdam Street Diary is a photo diary of Amsterdam. The pictures tell a story, about Amsterdam, the people and the change of seasons. I think, being Czech, I still look at the city as an outsider, so I notice details of typical Amsterdam life that Amsterdam born people probably won’t see.” One of Julie’s favourite areas in Amsterdam for photography is the Red Light District: “It is fascinating to see the contrasts in that area; the beautiful old houses and canals, the raw and sad atmosphere and the combination of people born and raised in Amsterdam with the sightseeing tourists.”

girl, window, Amsterdam 2012

Julie’s Amsterdam Street Dairy will be exhibited in the OBA in September for three months. On Amsterdam Cycle Chic we will post a few of the cycling pictures of her diary.

Amsterdam Street Diary

Cycling with…
Our friends from the Cycling with… blog went for a cycle with Julie. Check out the great result!

Cycling with Julie from Paddy Cahill on Vimeo.


Cyclist of the Month: Vitor from Recycled Bicycles

Cyclist of the MonthCyclist of the MonthCyclist of the Month
Please meet Vitor, a Portuguese bike fanatic who owns and runs Recycled Bicycles here in Amsterdam. He grew up in Lisbon  and has been BMX riding since he could pedal a bike. I meet him at his workshop on Spuistraat one rainy day to chat about his shop and his passion for bikes.

How did you end up here in Amsterdam?

I came here for a visit in the early 90s and loved the cycling culture. In ’96 a friend of mine was living here, so I crashed at his place for a month and really got to know the city. I moved here shortly after.

When did you start up Recycled Bicycles?

In around 2002, I was sick of the menial jobs I was doing at the time, tired of working for someone else too. Since I’m a BMX rider I’ve always been around bikes–I love fixing up my own bike and I was already helping out friends too. So I started up the shop to build bikes in 2003. We’ll be celebrating 10 years next month!

Cyclist of the MonthCyclist of the MonthCyclist of the MonthCyclist of the Month

Where do get all the parts of the bikes?

When I opened the shop, I built all the bikes from abandoned parts on the streets.But one day, the police came knocking on my door and told me I couldn’t use the abandoned parts from the street or in the trash–that it’s illegal to go through the trash and take home parts of bikes. So now I have to buy the bikes from the Gemeente, like everyone else. I wish they had a better system for the small businesses like mine; I’m competing with so many larger businesses that have much more money.

What is the bike culture like in Lisbon?

Different from Amsterdam, but growing every day. There are many more people on bikes now–not just for exercise, they are going from A to B. One day we’ll see some fietspad in Lisbon…

Do you have other hobbies besides BMX and building bikes?

I also play bike polo. It’s a tight-knit sport right now, just a small group of us here in Amsterdam play, but it’s gaining momentum. I also want to get more into long-distance riding. I did a ride from Paris to Lisbon, and it was an epic journey. I want to do it again, but on a fixed gear bike this time.

Thank you Vitor! Keep on building those bikes.

by Meredith

Cyclist of the MonthCyclist of the MonthCyclist of the Month


Cyclist of the Month: Else, our team member living in Buenos Aires‏

In September 2012 our Cycle Chic team member Else moved (temporarily) from Amsterdam to Buenos Aires. She has been living here for about four months and already succeeded to set up Buenos Aires Cycle Chic, so we really believe she deserves to be crowned as our Cyclist of the Month!

Else-cotm1

WHY DID YOU MOVE TO BUENOS AIRES?

After I finished my studies it was a good time to flee the country for a while, not having a permanent job and all. Besides, like so many others, I wanted to experience living in another environment with a different culture, learning a new language, and all that.Although I never visited before, Argentina seemed like the perfect place. It’s a country with a very interesting past and present, beautiful and very diverse nature, lots of sunshine, wine and steaks. And hearing many good stories about Buenos Aires – most of them true – made the choice pretty easy. The ocean separating it from the Netherlands is also a plus.

 

WHAT ARE YOU DOING IN BA?

Of course I’m learning Spanish. I also write a little about art and culture – not in Spanish – for a magazine/paper. Besides that I’m  organizing a bicycle event with the Netherlands Institute Buenos Aires (NIBA). This institute aims at establishing cultural and scientific exchange between the Netherlands and Argentina. The bicycle event is called Holanda en Bici and will take place in April. There will be an exhibition in the public space, a big bicycle tour and expert meetings about various subjects, like urban planning and infrastructure. The aim is not only to portray the Dutch bicycle culture, but also to hitch in to the current interest and development of the bicycle culture in Buenos Aires and contribute to it.

Else-cotm2

YOU HAVE STARTED BACC, CONGRATULATIONS WITH THIS. CAN YOU TELL US HOW THIS ALL HAPPENEND?

As I was part of the Amsterdam Cycle Chic-team, it seemed like an obvious choice to continue my involvement with cycling in Buenos Aires. As a Cycle Chic blog promotes the daily use of the bicycle and, at the same time, portrays a city’s cycling culture, it would really add something to the scene here. Besides that it’s just a lot of fun. That’s why I started it and am now blogging with several others (Dutch and Argentinean). 

Buenos Aires Cycle Chic

HOW IS LIFE ON 2 WHEELS IN BA?

It’s a bit of a jungle out here. The city is not very bicycle friendly. You have some bicycle lanes, but most of them are narrow and curved. Though you are relieved whenever you encounter one; zigzagging past cars, taxis, buses, motors, etc. can be pretty intense. But besides that, the city is working hard on becoming more bicycle-friendly and getting people to cycle. There is a very colorful and lively bicycle scene. Plus, the city’s landscape is ideal for cycling, and eventhough it might cause you several heart attacks, there’s nothing better than cruising through Buenos Aires on two wheels.

 

WHAT DO YOU WANT TO BE ACCOMPLISHED BEFORE COMING BACK TO AMSTERDAM?

I hope Buenos Aires Cycle Chic is fully up and running with a lot of followers and ‘likes’ on our Facebook page, and an enthusiastic team who will continue blogging.

Else-cotm3

 

AND LAST BUT NOT LEAST, WHAT IS YOUR BIKE LIKE?!

It’s a second hand bicycle, which I bought through Mercado Libre, the Argentinean e-bay. It’s a bit rusty and unstable, but I already got attached to it. As I will not be here forever, it’s perfect for the time being. 

Thank you Else for this interview and those nice pictures.

We look forward to seeing you soon in Amsterdam!

Take care,

Aude, on behalf of the ACC team


Cyclist of the Month: ‘Miss Fair Fashion’ Marieke

Meet ‘Miss fair fashion’ Marieke Eyskoot: her mission is to make fair fashion normal in the Netherlands. “For me fashion is a way to celebrate life. I love it! But it should also be nice for the people who make it. I can’t enjoy clothes that people made in terrible working conditions.” For many years people have asked Marieke where they can buy fair fashion, what to look out for when shopping, easy things they can do for a more ‘fair lifestyle’ and if a fair lifestyle isn’t too expensive? Those questions made Marieke decide to write the book ‘Talking Dress- Vertelt je alles over eerlijke kleding (en lifestyle)’ that was recently published.
talking dress 1 by Aude
‘Talking Dress’ is a guide –written in Dutch – to a fair lifestyle in the Netherlands and Belgium. The book shows you the way to your own fair fashion lifestyle. Ranging from shopping tips to DIY-tricks, from washing instructions to swapping ideas, from clothes to accessories, beauty products, food and even marriage: Talking Dress makes it easy (and fun!) to do good and look great at the same time.
beter en leuk by Aude
We love Marieke’s book and know that she uses her bike every day, so we asked her for an interview. We met in the lovely fair lunchroom and boutique ‘Beter & Leuk’ on the Eerste Oosterparkstraat.

Marieke and her bike

“This interview is a tribute to my bike. I bought it second hand in 1996 for 100 guilders and I have cycled it daily through the streets of Amsterdam since then.” The frame is from 1967 and it is a classical black Gazelle Dutch bike. But after more than 40 years some essential parts can’t be repaired anymore. So Marieke has to get a new bike. The decision of which bike to get was an easy one; “A Roetz bike of course!” Roetz’ bikes are sustainable and fair bikes made in the Netherlands. (Read more about Roetz on our blog).
talking dress 3 by Aude
“I love to cycle and I use my bike every day, to go to my office, to meetings, to go out and to go for cycles in the weekend. I like to go fast on my bike. It is a great break every day to cycle in between the many meetings, phone calls and long hours behind a computer. The movement, the wind or sun and just being outside for a while make me feel relaxed. When I pass bridges I always slow down a bit, to enjoy the beautiful city and look at the water.”

“I can still clearly remember the moment I learned to cycle. I was with my father practising in the street where I grew up. I was cycling and he was running beside me, holding me. Suddenly I heard him quite far behind me shouting ‘I am not holding you anymore!’ and from that moment on, I could cycle on my own!”

talking dress 2 by Aude

Text by Joni – Pictures by Aude

 
Links


Happy birthday to us!

Today our blog is 1 year old! Let’s celebrate it and choose the best picture of the year…all 4 of us (Joni, Else, Meredith and Aude) picked our 2 favorite pictures. Now it is your turn to choose your favorite one among our selection and enter the contest:

Father and son:
Father and son by Else

Sexy sunday:
by Meredith

Dreaming away:
dreaming away by Aude

Business man:
Business man by Aude

Good laugh:
good laugh by Aude

Japanese scenery:
japanese scenery II by Aude

Opa:
Ed3 by Aude

Together:
by Meredith

Have you made your choice? Please let us know (comment below) or on facebook.
You may be the lucky one winning this saddle cover! There are 3 saddle covers to win, we will pick randomly 3 people who shared their choice with us..so don’t miss it, you have until Friday 21st december!

saddle cap pink to win saddle cap pink to win saddle cap pink to win


Cyclist of the month: Ed, coolest Opa ever!

Ed is born in Assendelft. He moved with his sweet wife Ellie to Amsterdam in the 60’s where they got 3 daughters. Ed retired 8 years ago after having served as a social worker for 30 years. Next to his work, Ed has always been a big collector. He used to pile baskets on his bakfiets and cycle all over Amsterdam, looking for pieces of bikes, etc.
Ed1 by Aude
As you can see, both house and bicycle storage contain huge collections of all kinds of items Amsterdammers ever left on the street…
Ed2 by Aude
One day, Ed and his wife were asked by their daughter to look after her newborn twins: Ines and Sofia. Ed’s daughter is a graphic designer and works full time from home. She is very good by the way, see here.
As they live on opposite sides of Amsterdam, Ed had to find a solution to go and get Ines and Sofia twice a week.
So 1,5 year ago, Ed decided to give a new life to his bakfiets. He removed the pile of baskets and made this unique creation to carry this precious duo:
Ed3 by Aude
The bakfiets itself is actually older than Ed himself! But, as Ed likes to put it: «this sort of quality is nowhere to be found anymore these days».
As you can imagine, they do not go unnoticed. Many tourists as well as locals have already got a snap of them!

Don’t think this is the only bakfiets redesigned by Ed. He has one more, a very special one:
Ed4 by Aude Ed5 by Aude

This is a picture he took of another of his daughters with some more grandkids:Ed6 by AudeThis bakfiets has a nice story :Ed7 by AudeTranslation : «The story started with my friend Henk. A long time ago he made a bakfiets in the form of a bible. He used to cycle around Amsterdam with it for years. He also set up the bakfietsclub of Amsterdam. I became myself the chairman, secretary and treasurer. Henk passed away a few years ago. It seemed that his last wish was to be buried in his bible. So we drove him in his bakfiets to his last resting place. Henk’s daughters offered me the undercarriage of the bakfiets. In his attic, Henk still kept a float of a waterplane;just to have something to sail away with, in case a deluge would ever occur. We have then installed the float on the bakfiets and it is still on it today.» Ed Koomen.

Ed8 by Aude

Ed9 by Aude Ed10 by Aude

Ed never had a car, he is a member of the cyclist union Fietsersbond. He is a real Dutch man; healthy and happy to cycle! Inspired by the Roman times, his motto is «veni, vidie, fietsie».

Ines and Sofia : enjoy the ride!

Ed11 by Aude

Reportage by Aude

PS : As it’s never too late to start learning Dutch, here you go: Opa = grandfather and bakfiets = delivery bike


Cyclist of the Month – New Team Member Meredith

Amsterdam cycle chic

Aude: Where are you from?

Meredith: I am originally from the beautiful Central Coast of California. I first moved to Rotterdam in December 2010, when I just finished urban planning studies at UC Berkeley, and my husband was accepted to graduate school at Erasmus. Now we live in Amsterdam, since July ’12, and totally love it here.

Amsterdam Cycle Chic

Aude: How do find living in Amsterdam?

Meredith: Of course I dearly miss our friends and family, but our Dutch life is easy to love. I have totally fallen for this city; there’s always something to see, a new adventure every day, a gezellig café to try, and of course, riding a bicycle is so easy and so chic. On the side, I have my own photo blog about our life and travels here called Dutch Pancake.

Amsterdam cycle chic

Amsterdam cycle chic

Aude: Tell us the story about your bike.

Meredith: It was love at first site. I named her Rosa. She is a second-hand Batavus Old Dutch from a bike shop in the Pijp.  I added the bike shelf thingie and a second-hand basket from my favorite vintage store on Vijzelstraat.

Aude: How did you find us and why?

Meredith: I met the guy behind Copenhagen Cycle Chic at an event at the Pakhuis and he introduced me to Joni. As an urban planner and cycling fiend (and photography enthusiast), it just seemed natural to be a part of this cycle chic movement. Any way I can promote cycling to the world–I’m in!

Aude: Well, welcome! We’re glad to have you join us!

Amsterdam Cycle Chic

Amsterdam Cycle Chic

Pictures of Meredith by Aude – Pictures of bike & text by Meredith


Cyclist of the Month – Singer songwriter Jerusa

At Fa. Speijkervet, a recently opened restaurant in Amsterdam West, we meet Jerusa, who works there as a waitress. Living in the East of town, work is a little out of the way, but this cycling-loving lady enjoys the ride. Her firm and traditional bicycle makes it all the more pleasant. Besides, the ride is more than worth it: her brother is chef de cuisine and the menu makes your mouth water (Check out Speijkervet’s Facebook page). No wonder this place is already a settled hotspot.

jerusa1 by Else
jerusa2 by Else
Next to waitressing, Jerusa’s main objective is her music career. As a singer songwriter she describes her music as singer song pop meets indie pop. She has lived in New York and Nashville to write songs, gain experience and perform (and of course, used her bicycle to get from A to B). She is currently forming a band, writing her own material and is contracted with Dutch pop singer Ilse de Lange. Not too bad (check out her twitter with a link to her music channel). And oh yes, she’s also busy studying for a bachelor’s degree in Psychology. Needless to say this pretty and talented girl puts the chic into cycle chic!

jerusa4 by Else

jerusa3 by Else

jerusa5 by Else


Cyclist of the Month: Mathijs the shoemaker

Amsterdam cycle chic Amsterdam cycle chic
On a very hot day in Amsterdam (people were jumping in the canals to cool down) we met up with Mathijs. Mathijs is a 24-year old freewheeler who is a hands-on kind of guy. After being apprenticed by a traditional cordwainer, Mathijs is now starting up his own business as a shoemaker. He makes handcrafted leather shoes, which last a lifetime. His handiness and inventiveness are also represented on his bicycle. Inspired by Swiss military bicycles from the early twentieth century he created his own framebag from truck tarp. With this rock solid bag he uses the spatial design of his bicycle to the fullest and has his bottle of water and swimsuit within reach.

Amsterdam cycle chic

by Else


Cyclist of the Month: Tomas with his bike tattoo

Meet Tomas. This good-looking 25-year old bartender from Amsterdam has a distinctive feature: check out his awesome tattoo. His natural appeal to cycling (who from Amsterdam doesn’t love cycling..) and his admiration for the simple and clean design of the bicycle traffic sign, inspired him to decorate his own body with it. People recognize Tomas by his unique tattoo, and he already inspired at least one friend to take the same tattoo. Tomas would be the perfect mascot for Amsterdam Cycle Chic and he is an obvious pick for Cyclist of the Month.

Tomas with his opa-fiets psoing on a bridge

Tomas with his bike and bike tattoo

Tomas' tattoos; a bike and the three crosses of Amsterdam

Tomas with his bike tattoo

Close up of Tomas' bike tattoo

Tomas works both at Pacific Parc and Brandstof so you might see him around there and check out his tattoo in real life!

Pics and text by Else


Cyclist of the Month: Lauren the blogger

This beauty from Amsterdam was caught just before parking her bicycle to grab a take-away soup for dinner. Lauren (26) recently bought a racing bicycle to tour the Dutch flat countryside, a real trend amongst Amsterdam youth. But she just as much loves crossing through town on her Dutch bike with bicycle crate. Now that she finished her masters the summer has begun for her; cycling from park picknicks to work to late night dancing. In the meanwhile she blogs about the hidden treasures of Amsterdam for tourist site Spotted by Locals.

Cyclist of the Month: Lauren
Cyclist of the month: Lauren


Cyclist of the month…the resigned Prime Minister

Yesterday the Dutch cabinet resigned. After weeks of talks between the ruling parties, the party leaders couldn’t agree on austerity measures.

So? What does that have to do with cycling you might ask? Hardly anything to be honest. Only that the prime minister, Mark Rutte, always used his (ladies) bike to go to and from the meetings. That’s why we make him the Cyclist of the Month. That is at least one thing he can be proud of this week!

Cycle Chic: the resigned prime minister on his ladies bike

Cycle Chic: the resigned prime minister on his ladies bike

Cycle Chic: the resigned prime minister Mark Rutte on his ladies bike

Cycle Chic: the resigned prime minister on his ladies bikeCycle Chic: the resigned prime minister on his ladies bike


Cyclist of the Month: Eske the Strategy Consultant

On a very windy afternoon we meet Cyclist of the Month Eske Scavenius on his way to work. Eske is 26 years old and always cycles in a suit to his work as a strategy consultant in the Rembrandt tower; Amsterdam’s tallest skyscraper (which is only 150 meters tall…).

Cycle Chic: Eske the consultant cycles in his suit to work

Eske did not become Cyclist of the Month for nothing: when offered a company car, Eske decided to take a ‘company bicycle’. So instead of driving a BMW, Eske ‘rides’ a Gazelle. Remarkable, but not unique. An increasing amount of companies in The Netherlands offer their employees a company bicycle. For Eske it was an obvious decision to take the bike, not only because he lives only a twenty minutes cycle from work, but also because he simply loves cycling more than sitting in a car. And above all, it’s much better for the environment.

Eske in his suit in front of Amsterdam's Rembrandt tower

Eske is a very proud bicycle owner. Instead of going for a trendy bicycle with a retro-appearance (very popular in Holland), he went for a modern take on the classical Dutch bike. He added a traditional leather Brooks saddle that forms itself in time around your buttocks. Who needs a BMW to be fancy!?

Eske enjoys his commute every single time, rain or shine. A large part of the cycle follows the river Amstel and gives him a view of Amsterdam’s skyline. And there is certainly no better way to enjoy such views than from a bicycle’s perspective, with the wind blowing through your hair.

Eske the strategy consultant cycling home from the Rembrandt towerEske cycling on a windy day in Amsterdam


Cyclist of the Month: Sasha the Art Student

Sasha is a 24 year old Art History student, living and cycling in Amsterdam.

Almost every student from Amsterdam uses a bike to get from A to B. Therefore it can be a difficult task to find an empty spot in the crowded bicycle racks.

Student bikes_by Else

Sasha is very fond of her golden bike, which she calls her ‘oude gouden rakker’ (freely translated as her ‘old golden rascal’). A few years ago she put a rack on her bike to carry her heavy art books to classes.

Sasha at the Oudemanhuispoort_by Else


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 958 other followers